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Monday, 16 June 2014

Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) British philosopher, mathematician, and Nobel laureate, whose emphasis on logical analysis greatly influenced the course of 20th-century philosophy. “Our use of the phrase ‘the Dark Ages’ to cover the period from 699 to 1,000 marks our undue concentration on Western Europe… From India to Spain, the brilliant civilization of Islam flourished. What was lost to Christendom at this time was not lost to civilization, but quite the contrary… To us it seems that West-European civilization is civilization; but this is a narrow view.

Bertrand Russell

(1872-1970) British philosopher, mathematician, and Nobel laureate, whose emphasis on logical analysis greatly influenced the course of 20th-century philosophy.
“Our use of the phrase ‘the Dark Ages’ to cover the period from 699 to 1,000 marks our undue concentration on Western Europe… From India to Spain, the brilliant civilization of Islam flourished. What was lost to Christendom at this time was not lost to civilization, but quite the contrary… To us it seems that West-European civilization is civilization; but this is a narrow view.”
[History of Western Philosophy, London, 1948, p. 419]

Hamilton Alexander Roskeen Gibb

(1895-1971) A leading orientalist scholar of his time
“But Islam has a still further service to render to the cause of humanity. It stands after all nearer to the real East than Europe does, and it possesses a magnificent tradition of inter-racial understanding and cooperation. No other society has such a record of success uniting in an equality of status, of opportunity, and of endeavours so many and so various races of mankind … Islam has still the power to reconcile apparently irreconcilable elements of race and tradition. If ever the opposition of the great societies of East and West is to be replaced by cooperation, the mediation of Islam is an indispensable condition. In its hands lies very largely the solution of the problem with which Europe is faced in its relation with East.”
[Whither Islam, London, 1932, p. 379.]
“That his (Muhammad’s) reforms enhanced the status of women in general is universally admitted.”
[Mohammedanism, London, 1953, p. 33]

James A. Michener

(1907-1997) Leading American writer; recipient of honorary doctorates in five fields from thirty leading universities and decorated with the Presidential Medal of freedom, America’s highest civilian award.
“No other religion in history spread so rapidly as Islam . . . The West has widely  believed that this surge of religion was made possible by the sword. But no modern scholar accepts that idea, and the Qur’an is explicit in support of the freedom of conscience.”
[Islam - The Misunderstood Religion, Readers' Digest (American Edition) May 1955]

Edward Gibbon

(1737-1794) Considered the greatest British historian of his time.
“‘I believe in One God and Mohammed the Apostle of God,’ is the simple and invariable profession of Islam. The intellectual image of the Deity has never been degraded by any visible idol; the honours of the prophet have never transgressed the measure of human virtue, and his living precepts have restrained the gratitude of his disciples within the bounds of reason and religion.”
[History Of The Saracen Empire, London, 1870, p. 54]
“More pure than the system of Zoroaster, more liberal than the law of Moses, the religion of Mohammad might seem less inconsistent with reason than the creed of mystery and superstition which, in the seventh century, disgraced the simplicity of the gospels.”
[The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vol. 5. p. 487]

Jared Diamond

Professor of Physiology at the UCLA School of Medicine; recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1998.
“Medieval Islam was technologically advanced and open to innovation. It achieved far higher literacy rates than in contemporary Europe; it assimilated the legacy of classical Greek civilization to such a degree that many classical books are now known to us only through Arabic copies.  It invented windmills, trigonometry, lateen sails and made major advances in metallurgy, mechanical and chemical engineering and irrigation methods. In the middle-ages the flow of technology was overwhelmingly from Islam to Europe rather from Europe to Islam. Only after the 1500′s did the net direction of flow begin to reverse.”
[Guns, Germs, and Steel - The Fates of Human Societies, 1997, p. 253]

Annie Besant

(1847-1933) British theosophist and nationalist leader in India. President of the Indian National Congress in 1917.
“I often think that woman is more free in Islam than in Christianity. Woman is more protected by Islam than by the faith which preaches Monogamy. In Al-Quran the law about woman is more just and liberal. It is only in the last twenty years that Christian England, has recognized the right of woman to property, while Islam has allowed this right from all times.”
[The Life and Teachings of Muhammad, Madras, 1932, pp. 25, 26]
Source
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Every person who reads the Qur’an and thinks over it sincerely will realise some secrets that might not have caught his attention until then. When a person reads these verses, what he must do is to seek the divine purposes hidden in daily events and evaluate everything in the light of the Qur’an. Then, people will realize with excitement that the secrets of the Qur’an control both their own lives and those of others alike.
You can go to this address to listen to the audio book.


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In the ISLAMIC beginning…
In the Name of God the Most Compassionate the Most Merciful
Islamic Greetings
Salamun Alaykum: Peace be upon you
What is Islam and who is a Muslim?
Islam literally means: Submission or surrendering to God
Muslim is a person who believes in ‘Islam’.
The Emergence of Islam
Literally Islam began with the first prophet; Adam.
In its complete sense, Islam began with the first revelation to Prophet Muhammad in 25 June 610 AD at the age of 40 ( Muhammad was born in 28 April 570 AD).
The Main Sources of Knowledge in Islam:
The Holy Quran .
The Hadith (sayings and practical life of the Prophet Muhammad).
The bedrock of Islam:
In Theory: Faith in One God, Hereafter and Prophets.
In Practice: Righteous Deeds.
Main Beliefs
Monotheism: believing in Unique God who does not beget nor is He begotten.
Justice of God: believing that God is neither cruel nor unfair.
Prophecy: believing in all God’s Messengers from Adam to Muhammad.
Successors of the Prophet: Imam Ali and his 11 offspring.
Resurrection: believing in the day of Judgment: Eternity in Hell or Heaven.
Islam in Practice
Jurisprudence: Worshipping (Daily Prayers, Fasting, Charity (Zakat and Khoms), Pilgrimage to Hajj, Jihad, enjoining good and forbidding evil, befriending friends of God and dissociation from the enemies of God), only Halal meat is permissible to eat. All types of intoxicants are forbidden. Gambling is forbidden. Marriage is very recommended act and divorce is permissible but detested.
The noble social rule in Islam:
“Repel evil with what is best.” (i.e. don’t repel evil with evil)
Two Main Muslim Denominations:
Shi’a: Those who believe Prophet Muhammad (P)- by the divine command- appointed Ali; his son-in-law and cousin, and his 11 offspring ending with Imam Mahdi, as his caliphs.
Sunni: Those who the Prophet (P) did not appoint anyone after himself to lead the Muslim community.
Islamic Calendar and Main Festivals:
Muslim Calendar is lunar.
Holidays in Islam are holy days.
Eidul-Fitr (celebrating successfully ending the Month of Fasting).
Eidul-Adha (celebrating successfully ending the Hajj pilgrimage).
Eidul-Ghadir (celebration of divine appointment of Imam Ali, by the Prophet as the authority after him: 70 days prior to Prophet’s demise.).
Ashura ( Commemoration of martyrdom of the grandson of the Prophet; Imam Husain and his loyal companions).
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As what kind of entity does Islam envisage Woman? Does it consider her the equal of man  in terms of dignity and the respect accorded to her, or is she thought of as belonging to an inferior species? This is the question which we now wish to answer.
 The particular philosophy of Islam concerning family rights:
 Islam has a particular philosophy concerning the family rights of men and women which is contrary to what has been going on in the last fourteen centuries and with what is actually happening now. Islam does not believe in one kind of right, one kind of duty and one kind of punishment for both men and women in every instance. It considers one set of rights and duties and punishments more appropriate for men, and one set more appropriate for women. As a result on some occasions Islam has taken a similar position as regards both women and men, and on other occasions different positions.
 Why is that so and what is its basis? Is. that why Islam, also, like many other religions, has derogatory views concerning women and has considered woman to be of an inferior species, or does it have some other reasons and another philosophy?
 You may have heard repeatedly in the speeches, lectures and writings of the followers of western ideas that they consider Islamic laws concerning dowry, maintenance, divorce and polygyny, and other laws like them, as being contemptuous of, and insulting to, the female sex. In this way they try to create the impression that those provisions only prove that man alone has been favoured.
 They say that all the rules and laws in the world before the twentieth century were based upon the notion that man, due to his sex, is a nobler being than woman, and that woman was created simply for the benefit and use of man. Islamic rights also revolve in this same orbit of man’s interest and benefit.